BURMA ELECTION VII – A chance for freedom

The people of Myanmar are going to the polls to vote in a by-election for 45 parliamentary seats. This blog is covering the vote live from Yangon

Millions of people across the country are heading to the ballot boxes to cast their votes in this historic election. Some people have been turning up in family groups, others on their own, clutching their pink registration cards.

Feelings of excitement have been running through the city since polls opened at 0600 local time. In Mingalar Thaung Nyaunt township, in downtown Yangon, 64-year-old U Dan Suu said he was “very happy for this opportunity”. A young woman who voted shortly after him was also pleased to have had “a chance for freedom”.

A 72-year-old man, who wished to remain anonymous, said “I want to be [living] under a democracy. We had democracy here, before 1962. I want it again.” He believed that Pyu Pyu Din, the local NLD candidate, would win easily, although he himself was not voting because his township is not holding a by-election.

The elation has been tempered elsewhere by reports of fraud and intimidation by the ruling, government-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party.

Last night, in Aung San Suu Kyi’s Kawmhu constituency, government party campaigners turned up in 15-20 vehicles to speak to the residents. One local woman told Burmese media that the USDP were trying to trick the pro-NLD villagers into putting a tick next to Suu Kyi’s name on the ballot paper if they liked her and a cross next to USDP if they were against the ruling party. Such a move would spoil the sheet. There were also reports that people were being bribed to turn up to a USDP open-air campaigning event.

The international observers have a real job on their hands and there are simply too many polling stations in each township to be able to attend them all. Local officials are trying to monitor the voting but some members of the NLD have already been running around totting up the votes they have received hour-by-hour. Some results should be out within a few hours of the vote; the scores from other townships may take up to a week to verify and release.

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