BURMA ELECTION X – ‘I would die for Aung San Suu Kyi’

The NLD has won by a landslide in the by-election in Myanmar, securing 43 of the 44 seats it contested. This blog has been covering the election live from Yangon.

After the mania surrounding Aung San Suu Kyi’s speech died down and The Lady went home to rest, what were the feelings of party officials and members inside the National League for Democracy’s Yangon HQ?

1. Ye Naung

The 23-year-old member of the NLD’s Youth Generation reveals a scar on the right-side of his head. It is a permanent reminder of the violent treatment he suffered at the hands of the police when he was just 18 and taking part in pro-democracy protests. Amongst mouthfuls of rice and green pepper curry he went on to speak movingly of his love for his ‘Mother Suu’.

“I fully believe in Aung San Suu Kyi. I would give everything for her. I would die for her”

2. Daw Lai Lai

For party official Daw Lai Lai, 64, the possible hurdles the NLD may face in parliament from the government’s Union Solidarity and Development Party are dismissed with a laugh and a swish of hand. She confirms that the NLD policy of hoping to change the constitution will be pursued in parliament but underlines the momentum that comes with the landslide win “this is no time to stop and party”. Daw Lai Lai also reiterates that “the people do not want a military government and points out how she feels the country should be restructured in two upheavals:

“The military under the government. And the government under the people.”

3. Dr Myo Aung

Former physician Myo Aung is one of the new MPs who will be representing the NLD in parliament. The doctor had been jailed for twelve-month sentences on two separate occasions for speaking out against the government.

He cited five main concerns in his Seik Kan township, 25 miles outside Yangon, that he wanted to raise in the capital, Naypyidaw. They were, firstly: lack of infrastructure; access to running water; and efficient electricity supply. And also the problems of water-borne diseases prevalent in the rainy season when open sewers spill out onto the streets and the issue of compensation for local farmers who had been subjected to compulsory purchase yet had not been rewarded for the move.

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